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John Wheeler: Weather is never evenly distributed

The casual weather observer might be inclined to say, "Well, these things will even out over time," but reality is a little more complicated.

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FARGO โ€” It is the extraordinarily variable nature of Northern Plains/Upper Midwest weather, in the spring in particular, that produces our wide variety of weather. It makes it difficult to describe what sort of weather is typical for any time of year, but especially spring. In the seven days ending Sunday, rainfall has varied from none across much of northern Minnesota to a large area of three to six inches in central North Dakota and another large area of three to nine inches in southern Minnesota.

The casual weather observer might be inclined to say, "Well, these things will even out over time," but reality is a little more complicated. Yes, the constant variability that is weather will cause wet areas to eventually go dry and dry areas to eventually go wet. However, this process is forever uneven. There is no pattern to wet and dry or any of the other weather variables. In other words, there is no such thing as precisely normal weather.

John Wheeler is Chief Meteorologist for WDAY, a position he has had since May of 1985. Wheeler grew up in the South, in Louisiana and Alabama, and cites his family's move to the Midwest as important to developing his fascination with weather and climate. Wheeler lived in Wisconsin and Iowa as a teenager. He attended Iowa State University and achieved a B.S. degree in Meteorology in 1984. Wheeler worked about a year at WOI-TV in central Iowa before moving to Fargo and WDAY..
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