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SCIENCE

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Even though wastewater surveillance is proving to be the most accurate and economical way to gauge COVID activity in communities across the country, funding for this type of tracking hasn’t been consistent. And data collection is sometimes paused while wastewater researchers look for new ways to pay for the surveillance. Besides COVID, the technique is being used to track the spread of monkeypox.
The University of Minnesota is working on testing techniques as monkeypox continues to spread and polio appears in New York City wastewater.
The $9 billion infrared telescope, built for NASA by aerospace giant Northrop Grumman Corp., is expected to revolutionize astronomy by allowing scientists to peer farther than before and with greater clarity into the cosmos, to the dawn of the known universe.
Patrick Walsh grew up near Forada and attended school in Osakis.
Known as “forever chemicals” for their persistence in the environment, PFAS have been popular with manufacturers for decades and can be found in everything from nonstick cookware coating to fire-extinguishing foam. Higher levels of exposure to PFAS have been linked to increased cancer risk, developmental delays in children, damage to organs such as the liver and thyroid, increased cholesterol levels and reduced immune functions, especially among young children.
By the Echo Press Editorial Board

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Identification of new strains through whole-genome sequencing is a process far more complex than the standard lab tests used to clinically diagnose a patient with COVID-19.
The gut microbiome has been shown to play a role in ways that are both positive and negative in health. A team of researchers from Sanford Health and North Dakota State University will explore whether certain gut bacteria can trigger stress eating.
To do that, they need to bridge the gap between purely scientific researchers and clinical professionals. The SMHS has been emphasizing work in the area of translational research, which aims to “translate” scientific research into practical treatments. That work is being done through the Dakota Cancer Collaborative on Translational Activity (DaCCoTA), a clinical translational research center (CTR), that pairs in teams doctors and researchers.

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