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OPIOIDS

The state Bureau of Criminal Apprehension on Jan. 25 requested public help after 35 overdoses in north-central Minnesota since Dec. 1, 2022.
by the Echo Press Editorial Board
Minnesota has reached several other settlements with opioid companies over the last two and a half years that have brought the state hundreds of millions of dollars.
Pat Homstad, of Duluth, shared his journey of recovery from Opioid Use Disorder (OUD) and his sister, Dr. Allison Juba — an Alomere Health Family Medicine Physician in Alexandria — also spoke during a Listen and Learn event on Wednesday, July 20.

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Last year had twice as many deaths as the state saw 10 years ago, and numbers have climbed significantly since 2018 when there were just over 600.
Opioid Use Disorder (OUD) remains a growing concern in the United States, with more than 100,000 overdoses occurring in 2021 alone.
Acute and chronic pain are unrelated and must be treated as such, says author of new book on the complexity of chronic pain and the need for a multispecialty, non-opioid model of chronic pain treatment.
Fentanyl has taken root in Montana and in communities across the Mountain West during the pandemic, after formerly being prevalent mostly east of the Mississippi River, said Keith Humphreys of the Stanford-Lancet Commission on the North American Opioid Crisis. Montana law enforcement officials have intercepted record numbers of pale-blue pills made to look like prescription opioids such as OxyContin. Nationwide, at least 103,000 people died from drug overdoses in 2021, a 45% increase from 2019, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. About 7 of every 10 of those deaths were from synthetic opioids, primarily fentanyl.
Counties and cities are set to receive 75 percent of the funding, while the state will see 25 percent. The money is set to be used for response to the opioid epidemic and its fallout.
The pharmacies are accused of giving cash handouts to keep customers coming back, and one allegedly distributed its own currency, “monkey bucks,” inspired by a pet monkey that was once a common sight behind the counter.

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About 1.6 million Americans have an opioid use disorder. Taking opioids for longer than three months increases your risk of addiction by 15 times.
West-central Minnesota health system is implementing an easy reference guide for physicians and information for patients about managing acute pain without using opioid pain medications. Often, the first line of treatment is over-the-counter painkillers, which doctors say are more effective than people think.
Overdose rescue medications do not require a prescription and can be located at nearby locations found on a new Naloxone Finder web page.

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