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CORN

Anne Waltner, Parker, South Dakota, left a full-time career as a concert pianist and educator to join her parents’ farming operation. Along the way she married, had triplet daughters and survived cancer. Of her journey and life, she says: “Can you think of anybody luckier than me?”
The Honeyford grain elevator, North Dakota's oldest cooperative elevator, is the first south of the U.S.-Canadian border to load an 8,500-foot — 1.6 miles-long — unit train. The train full of corn was bound for Canada.
Gerald Bachmeier, chief executive officer of Red Trail Energy, Richardton, North Dakota, and Philip Coffin, vice president of Midwest AgEnergy LLC, at Underwood, North Dakota, discuss countermoves to a drought for acquiring local corn and getting it from eastern producers. Both companies started their histories by bringing corn in on unit trains and are preparing to do it again. Both are planning to inject and store carbon dioxide byproducts for a market advantage.
“The timing of the rain was too late to make a difference for our earliest soybeans, but it did help many of our later fields fill pods better,” according to one farmer in Valley City, North Dakota.

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A small organic farm family near Le Sueur, Minnesota, and a larger, non-GMO farmer near Kasson, Minnesota, are among those hit hard by the Pipeline Foods bankruptcy, which sent shockwaves through the region’s organic markets. The company is asking the courts to let them sell inventory grain to pay off the secured creditors, not the farmers who deliver it. The case leaves farmers wondering whether the state does enough to protect farmers and verify the financial soundness of grain traders.
Mike and Kristi Blattner, owners of Produce Plus in Eyota, have been selling coveted sweet corn for over 30 years. They continue to grow each year.
The corn seed may have come from birds or a dropped corn from a farm truck, and once it found some moisture it started growing.
University of Minnesota Extension specialists spent the day on July 8 demonstrating trials at its plot in Rochester.
Alexandria retiree helped turn Minnesota into a corn growing powerhouse
WILLMAR, Minn. — Hurricane Michael ripped through portions of Georgia and Alabama in 2018, causing millions of dollars in damage to peanut and cotton crops.

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A Douglas County family harvests sweet corn weeks earlier than most other growers.
Corn and soybean yields in Minnesota are expected to be decisively lower than last year, the National Agricultural Statistics Service said Friday.
Corn prices dipped in September in Minnesota, but remained well above the 2018 price, while the soybean price had also ticked up, according to the latest USDA-National Agricultural Statistics Service price report.

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