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Observations from the archives, 1964: Hospital room rates to increase

1914, 100 years ago: In Alexandria the school board discussed the matter of building a new high school. The crowded condition of the school compels some action in the near future. There are 212 students in the high school and 16 in the teacher's ...

1914, 100 years ago: In Alexandria the school board discussed the matter of building a new high school. The crowded condition of the school compels some action in the near future. There are 212 students in the high school and 16 in the teacher’s training class. Total enrollment is growing and will soon reach the 800 mark. … Every boy or young man in Douglas County who cannot attend school for the full year should take advantage of the Alexandria High School Short Course for farm boys. Agriculture, manual training, and those common branches that the pupils desire to take will be taught by experts in their lines.
1964, 50 years ago: The governing boards of the Douglas County and Our Lady of Mercy hospitals announced a raise in their room rates, effective January 1. Reasons for increased rates include new scientific developments require new supplies, more efficient diagnosis and treatments, higher medical standards, improved patient care and higher salaries for specially trained personnel. … Some 6,000 visitors crowded KCMT-TV’s open house at its new building located on the corner of Seventh and Hawthorne in Alexandria this fall. The 10,000 square foot building allows ample space for working and for handling large numbers of people such as choirs and live audiences. KCMT-TV went on the air in 1958 from the basement of the Runestone Electric Association building, employs 44 people, as well as 12 others at the Walker station. The stations now serve 34 Minnesota counties. Glenn Flint is beginning his seventh year as general manager. … There were 450 youngsters who turned out for the first Lion’s Club-sponsored teen-hop at the Algon Ballroom in Alexandria.
1989, 25 years ago: Join the newly-formed Alexandria Chorus. The idea for the group started during a recent Alexandria Area Arts Association (AAAA) membership drive. Les Dehlin, local retired choral teacher, has agreed to become the chorus’ director. Jane Belanger, music teacher and vice president of AAAA, will serve as the chorus coordinator. High school graduates and older can join. No audition is needed.
2004, 10 years ago: Pictured in the December 1 issue of the Echo Press: Three generations of the Osterberg family of Alexandria sing the Star Spangled Banner at the University of Minnesota Homecoming game in October. All four attended the university. The men include Richard “Sonny,” his son, Pat, and grandsons Richard “Dick” and Stephen. Brothers Stephen and Dick Osterberg both play the tuba in the U of M Marching Band and are in the hockey pep band.
Just for fun – 1964, 50 years ago: Twenty-nine Central Minnesota high school choirs are scheduled to appear before their largest audience during the Christmas holidays. Each year, KCMT-TV produces a series of holiday musical programs.
Sports Trivia – 1989, 25 years ago: Alexandria’s version of the “Twin Towers:” Jeni Egge and Angie Converse led the scoring to lead the Alexandria Cardinal girls basketball team to a 59-42 win over Monticello. Egge scored 23 and Converse scored 19 points. 1964, 50 years ago: Ice fishing has become a major Minnesota winter sport. More than 61,000 fish house licenses will be sold this season if the trend of recent years continues. The figure does not include the thousands of fishermen who ice fish without using a shelter.
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Rachel Barduson of Alexandria is a regular contributing columnist to the Echo Press Opinion page.

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The following is an opinion column written by an Echo Press editorial staff member. It does not necessarily reflect the views of the Echo Press.
This week in history in Douglas County.
This week in history in Douglas County.
The following is an opinion column written by an Echo Press editorial staff member. It does not necessarily reflect the views of the Echo Press.