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From the Echo Press archives, 1972: Junior Viking Sportsmen offer skunk bounties — roadkill not allowed

This week in history in Douglas County.

Picture of Rachel Barduson
Rachel Barduson
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This Week in 1997 – 25 years ago: Alexandria residents toured the city’s new water treatment plant which has been in operation since June. The $2.8 million plant has been hailed as a major improvement that will meet the city’s needs well into the 21st century. Alexandria Mayor John Perino cut the ribbon to officially open the plant. Also taking part in the ceremonies were ALP General Manager Al Crowser, Operations Manager Scott Deitz, Water Superintendent Gary Eiden, Plant Operator Hank Chan, Finance Manager Jerry Wright, members from the Public Works Board and other city officials.

1972, 50 years ago: Citizen’s Field, the first truly adequate football complex in Alexandria history, was turned over to District 206 by the Community Recreation Development Council in a dedication and homecoming program. Jim Chan, as president of the development council, made the official presentation of the field to the school district to Dr. Carl Bloomquist, president of the school board. The crowd was one of the largest, if not the largest, in school history as the football team thumped Morris 24-0.

A most unusual adjunct to the elementary physical education program in Alexandria is a Jogging Club that has 250 Lincoln Elementary School children taking part, with similar proportions of students from Washington, Carlos, Garfield and Miltona also taking part. Children can run, walk or jog with total goals for distance covered over a period of time. Grades one, two and three have a 12 mile standard overall, Grades four, five and six a total of 25 miles.

1997, 25 years ago: The Alexandria Work Force celebrated its grand opening. The center is a combined office for the Rural Minnesota Concentrated Employment Program (CEP), Job Service of Minnesota, and Vocational Rehabilitation Services. It also serves as the local office for State Services of the Blind. The new office is located in the First Bank Building on 7th Street and Broadway in Alexandria.

2012, 10 years ago: The grain elevator at CHS Prairie Lakes Co-op in Lowry has one bunker with a half million bushels of corn ready to go, more than 80,000 bushels of soybeans and another 130,000 bushels of corn in towering piles. Dan Kvitek, grain marketing division manager at CHS Prairie Lakes Co-op said ample rain this spring helped get the crops going and the heat this summer created ideal growing conditions.

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Just for fun, 1972 – 50 years ago: Special areas of instruction that are a part of the Alexandria Area Technical Institute “Open House” are the avionics program located at the airport on Highway 27 identified by the DC-7 donated by Northwest Airlines; the marine and small engines program located in the Syvrud Building across from the bowling alley; and the automotive services program located in the O’Hotto Building at 14th and Broadway.

Sports Trivia, 1972 – 50 years ago: The Junior Viking Sportsmen, with some financial help from the Senior Vikings, are starting a skunk control contest. All skunks must be trapped or shot and no road-kills are allowed. Skunks will be counted every Wednesday from 6-8 behind the ball park in Alexandria. You have to bring in the whole animal and responsibility for disposal is yours. First prize is $1 for each skunk to the person who brings in the most with a limit of $100. Second prize is 50 cents per skunk with a limit of $25; third prize is 25 cents per skunk with a limit of $10.

Another addition to the many places in Douglas County that give out free NO PHEASANT HUNTING signs is the beautifully arranged and stocked K & K Sports Shop. Stop in and pick up your signs and browse around, it’s quite a place.

Rachel Barduson of Alexandria is a regular contributing columnist to the Echo Press Opinion page.

What To Read Next
This week in history in Douglas County.
This week in history in Douglas County.
The following is an opinion column written by an Echo Press editorial staff member. It does not necessarily reflect the views of the Echo Press.
This week in history in Douglas County.