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Celebrate November by making a gratitude pumpkin for a month full of thanks

When you're in the midst of a busy day, it's easy to forget about the people and things for which you're grateful. In this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion," Viv Williams demonstrates how to create a gratitude pumpkin.

Gratitude pumpkin
Creating a gratitude pumpkin reminds you to stay thankful every day.
Viv Williams / Post Bulletin
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ROCHESTER — Gratitude helps you stay in the moment and focus on the positive instead of the negative. An ever-expanding body of research supports the idea that gratitude provides health benefits. An article published online by UC Davis Health notes that gratitude may help people get through tough times. And that gratitude increases happiness and may boost immunity and lower blood pressure.

For many people, the month of November -- the Thanksgiving month -- is all about giving thanks and taking time to remember people and things for which we're grateful. Creating a gratitude pumpkin is a fun and meaningful way to celebrate it with your friends, family or even on your own.

How to make a gratitude pumpkin:

Supplies:

  • Pumpkin or gourd
  • Permanent marker

Directions:

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  • Each day, from now until Thanksgiving, write one thing for which you're grateful on your pumpkin. Start at the top near the stem and spiral the words downward. By the time the Thanksgiving holiday is here, your pumpkin will be covered with things that make you happy.
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Follow the  Health Fusion podcast on  Apple,   Spotify and  Google podcasts. For comments or other podcast episode ideas, email Viv Williams at  vwilliams@newsmd.com. Or on Twitter/Instagram/FB @vivwilliamstv.

MORE HEALTH FUSION:
Do you overindulge on Thanksgiving? A lot of people do. It can be hard to resist recipes you only get during the holidays. But if you chow down on foods and drinks that are high in salt, fat or caffeine, you may be at risk of "holiday heart." Viv Williams has details from Mayo Clinic cardiologists in this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion."

Opinion by Viv Williams
Viv Williams hosts the NewsMD podcast and column, "Health Fusion." She is an Emmy (and other) award-winning health and medical reporter whose stories have run on TV, digital and newspaper outlets nationwide. Viv is passionate about boosting people's health and happiness by helping them access credible, reliable and research-based health information from top experts. She regularly interviews experts and patients from leading medical institutions, such as Mayo Clinic.
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