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Franson says tweet wasn't about Twin Cities election

Rep. Mary Franson, R-Alexandria says that her tweet about transgender people last week had nothing to do with a city council election in Minneapolis that put two transgender candidates into office.

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Rep. Mary Franson, R-Alexandria says that her tweet about transgender people last week had nothing to do with a city council election in Minneapolis that put two transgender candidates into office.

On Nov. 8, the morning after the election, Franson tweeted on her personal Twitter account, "A guy who thinks he's a girl is still a guy with a mental condition."

In response, Minnesota DFL Chairman Ken Martin issued a news release saying that Franson's remarks were a "hurtful" attempt to cheapen the historic nature of the election and tried to "take the wind out of the sails of equality."

Franson later sent out another Tweet, saying, "There are times I don't practice kindness. For that I am sorry. While I do believe that one can't change their gender based on their feelings, I didn't need to tweet out my thoughts."

Franson added that this wasn't the first time she's offended "the social justice warriors and it won't be the last."

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The Echo Press printed an online story about the tweet on Friday. After the tweet made statewide news and generated heated debate on social media over the weekend, the Echo Press asked Franson to comment.

In an email to the newspaper on Monday, Franson said her tweet had nothing to do with the Minneapolis City Council. "Media just made up some fake news," she said.

When asked to clarify what prompted the tweet, Franson declined to comment on the record.

Franson said that the issue is over as far as she's concerned. She described the media coverage as a "nothing burger story."

Al Edenloff is the editor of the twice-weekly Echo Press. He started his journalism career when he was in 10th grade, writing football and basketball stories for the Parkers Prairie Independent.
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