ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Dist. 206 food gets makeover

Goodbye sugary sweets and hello to healthier snack choices in schools. [[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_preview","fid":"1039488","attributes":{"alt":"","class":"media-image","height":"180","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"180"}}]]That's the goa...

1039522+fruit C 76812605.jpg

Goodbye sugary sweets and hello to healthier snack choices in schools.
That’s the goal of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which recently published practical, science-based nutrition standards for snack foods and beverages sold to children during the school day. The standards, required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, will allow schools to offer healthier snack foods to children, while limiting junk food. District Food and Nutrition Services Director Barb Larson presented the updates of District 206’s food and nutrition services to the school board during its regular meeting on Monday, August 18. The new nutrition standards, named Smart Snacks in School, will continue to build on the healthy advancements of students’ lunches in efforts to make them tasty and nutritious. Larson explained that while this includes vending machines, fundraisers, and any food served in the entire district, it does not include the culinary arts curriculum so long as the food is not being sold during school hours. Any food served or sold during the school day on school grounds must: Be a “whole grain-rich” product; or Have as the first ingredient a fruit, a vegetable, a dairy product, or a protein food; or Be a combination of food that contains at least one fourth cup of fruit and/or vegetable; or Contain 10 percent of the Daily Value (DV) of one of the nutrients of public health concern in the 2010 Dietary guidelines for Americans (calcium, potassium, vitamin D, or dietary fiber). The foods must also meet several nutrient requirements regarding calorie, sodium, fat, and sugar limits, as shown in the provided chart. Because of the sodium limits, Larson wanted to move to have chocolate milk removed from the district. After strong opposition, she said, she changed her mind and is allowing the beverage to remain on the menu for another year. The Smart Snacks in School does allow for flavored fat free milk and milk alternatives to be served and sold. Other drinks include plain water, unflavored low fat milk, 100 percent fruit or vegetable juice, and 100 percent fruit and vegetable juice diluted with water and no added sweeteners. The standards also allow additional “no calorie” and “lower calorie” beverage options for high school students, so long as it’s no more than 20-ounce portions. These drinks include calorie-free flavored water and other flavored and/or carbonated beverages that are labeled to contain less than five calories per eight fluid ounces or less than/equal to 10 calories per 20 fluid ounces. Since there is no caffeine limit for high school students, Larson was excited to announce that select Caribou beverages will be offered at Perks Plus in Alexandria Area High School (AAHS). “We’re going to get certain recipes to follow Caribou’s menu,” Larson said. “No high school in Minnesota has this; the closest one is in Illinois.” Among the USDA upgrades to the food services in District 206, Larson decided to invest in new trays and real dishes for AAHS. The trays will match the tile in the cafeteria, while the real dishes will represent the educational component on not creating waste.Goodbye sugary sweets and hello to healthier snack choices in schools.
That’s the goal of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which recently published practical, science-based nutrition standards for snack foods and beverages sold to children during the school day. The standards, required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, will allow schools to offer healthier snack foods to children, while limiting junk food.District Food and Nutrition Services Director Barb Larson presented the updates of District 206’s food and nutrition services to the school board during its regular meeting on Monday, August 18.The new nutrition standards, named Smart Snacks in School, will continue to build on the healthy advancements of students’ lunches in efforts to make them tasty and nutritious.Larson explained that while this includes vending machines, fundraisers, and any food served in the entire district, it does not include the culinary arts curriculum so long as the food is not being sold during school hours.Any food served or sold during the school day on school grounds must:Be a “whole grain-rich” product; orHave as the first ingredient a fruit, a vegetable, a dairy product, or a protein food; orBe a combination of food that contains at least one fourth cup of fruit and/or vegetable; orContain 10 percent of the Daily Value (DV) of one of the nutrients of public health concern in the 2010 Dietary guidelines for Americans (calcium, potassium, vitamin D, or dietary fiber).The foods must also meet several nutrient requirements regarding calorie, sodium, fat, and sugar limits, as shown in the provided chart.Because of the sodium limits, Larson wanted to move to have chocolate milk removed from the district. After strong opposition, she said, she changed her mind and is allowing the beverage to remain on the menu for another year. The Smart Snacks in School does allow for flavored fat free milk and milk alternatives to be served and sold. Other drinks include plain water, unflavored low fat milk, 100 percent fruit or vegetable juice, and 100 percent fruit and vegetable juice diluted with water and no added sweeteners.The standards also allow additional “no calorie” and “lower calorie” beverage options for high school students, so long as it’s no more than 20-ounce portions. These drinks include calorie-free flavored water and other flavored and/or carbonated beverages that are labeled to contain less than five calories per eight fluid ounces or less than/equal to 10 calories per 20 fluid ounces.Since there is no caffeine limit for high school students, Larson was excited to announce that select Caribou beverages will be offered at Perks Plus in Alexandria Area High School (AAHS).“We’re going to get certain recipes to follow Caribou’s menu,” Larson said. “No high school in Minnesota has this; the closest one is in Illinois.”Among the USDA upgrades to the food services in District 206, Larson decided to invest in new trays and real dishes for AAHS. The trays will match the tile in the cafeteria, while the real dishes will represent the educational component on not creating waste.

Related Topics: HEALTH
What To Read Next
A certificate of compliance is an inspection that was conducted within five years on a new installation of a septic system or three years on an existing system.
Ebacco's operating manager, Len Worthington, is so concerned about the issue, he brought it to the attention of administrators at Alexandria Area High School.
The warrant was issued after Cole Michelson failed to appear for a hearing at Douglas County District Court on Wednesday, Jan. 25.
Tonya Bakewell Dreher will be honored during an online ceremony March 8.