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Dana Ferguson

Minnesota Capitol Correspondent

Dana Ferguson is a Minnesota Capitol Correspondent for Forum News Service. Ferguson has covered state government and political stories since she joined the news service in 2018, reporting on the state's response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the divided Statehouse and the 2020 election.

Ferguson is a St. Louis Park native and a current St. Paul resident who enjoys getting to know fellow Minnesotans and telling their stories.

Prior to joining Forum Communications, Ferguson covered the South Dakota Legislature for the Sioux Falls Argus Leader. In that position, she won several awards for her reporting on state government and health care issues.

She speaks both English and Spanish and would welcome your story ideas, feedback and recipe suggestions. You can reach her at dferguson@forumcomm.com or 651-290-0707.

The governor said he would meet with legislative leaders on Monday morning in hopes of reaching deals that could get approved in a special session.
The proposal would let the state's biggest breweries sell growlers from their taprooms and allow smaller breweries to sell four and six-packs of beer.
Lawmakers had just hours left to finish $8 billion in spending and tax plans before a midnight deadline and several large bills had not yet been wrapped up.
The compromise plan was announced Saturday, May 21, and could be the state's largest tax cut proposal in state history. Lawmakers would have to adopt it and the governor would have to sign it into law before the changes could take effect.
Both chambers of the Minnesota Legislature on Friday approved a plan to rewrite the state's liquor laws to boost the amount breweries can produce and still offer to-go sales from their taprooms.
Other issues delayed the bill's advance at the Capitol for months, but it appeared poised to move forward on Friday.
Lawmakers face a Sunday deadline to complete spending and tax bills and to pass them through both chambers. As of Friday morning, they had extensive work left to complete before then.
A conference committee on Thursday approved a compromise liquor bill and moved it forward.
State leaders said the situation was expected to improve within four to six weeks as additional varieties come to market.
Lawmakers on Wednesday tried to flesh out details for several spending bills at the Capitol ahead of a legislative deadline.