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ATCC Foundation receives $10,000 to support STEM education

The Alexandria Technical and Community College Foundation received a $10,000 AT&T contribution to support science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education during a check presentation on campus.

The Alexandria Technical and Community College Foundation received a $10,000 AT&T contribution to support science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education during a check presentation on campus.
The donation will help Alexandria Technical and Community College (ATCC) raise awareness of STEM-based careers among local high school students.
“The shortage of qualified employees in STEM careers, particularly in manufacturing and transportation in West-Central Minnesota, is close to crisis level,” said Laura Urban, ATCC president. “Creating positive images of STEM careers in these areas is just one of the strategies that ATCC and its industry partners are using to get more potential employees in the career pipeline.”
The funding will help ATCC support two initiatives – Manufacturing Tour Days and the Minnesota Technology and Engineering Educators Association (MTEEA) Supermileage Challenge – that expose high school students to STEM-based careers.
Manufacturing Tour Days is designed for ninth through 12th grade students. The students tour area manufacturing facilities to see a variety of settings and employment opportunities. They also tour ATCC’s high-tech manufacturing and transportation program.
The MTEEA Supermileage Challenge is held annually in May at Brainerd International Raceway. The competition challenges high school students to work together to produce the most fuel efficient vehicle. Nearly 800 students in 95 teams from 45 high schools participate.
“With a shortage of skilled workers predicted for STEM careers, it is vital that we have local colleges like ATCC working to help encourage and prepare our young people for jobs in this exciting and promising field,” said State Senator Bill Ingebrigtsen.
“With more and more baby boomers retiring, local businesses are facing a skills gap that requires workers to obtain greater education and training for emerging jobs, especially those in STEM careers,” added State Representative Bud Nornes. “Community colleges like ATCC play an important role in developing the workforce for the jobs of the future.”

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