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Give to the Max Day is November 15

Minnesotans ignited a national philanthropic movement with the launch of the first "Give to the Max Day" in 2009.

On November 15, they'll have their fourth annual opportunity to prove their record-breaking generosity by contributing to their favorite nonprofit organizations and schools.

During last year's Give to the Max Day, 47,534 donors logged on to GiveMN.org. The result: $13.4 million was raised for 3,978 Minnesota nonprofit organizations, whose missions range from feeding the hungry to protecting the environment, to promoting the arts.

Community members are encouraged to check with their favorite charities to see what their plans are for this day and how they may be able to help. Some non-profits may offer matching challenge grants along with incentives offered by GiveMN.

Since launching in 2009, donors have given more than $50 million to more than 6,700 nonprofit organizations on GiveMN.org.

This year, K-12 public schools will join the ranks of organizations that can benefit from the 24-hour giving fest. GiveMN launched Schools on GiveMN, allowing K-12 public schools to fundraise.

GiveMN is also making donating even easier. Minnesotans will be able to use smartphones and tablets to access GiveMN Mobile and donate by simply visiting GiveMN.org on their mobile browser.

The Most Creative Give to the Max Day Fundraising Campaign Award will be awarded to the winning nonprofit showing a creative approach to fundraising.

The $500 prize grant will be awarded at the Association of Fundraising Professionals Minnesota Chapter National Philanthropy Day luncheon November 16. Nonprofits must apply to be eligible to win.

At GiveMN, Minnesota nonprofits and schools can showcase their work and introduce their organizations to potential donors. Customized profiles of charities detail individual missions, programs and events.

The site also lets donors manage their charitable giving by recording online contributions and storing receipts.

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