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'Fargo' actor returns to Alex

An L.A.-based film crew and actor Peter Stormare (fourth from left, in back), shown here during a May visit, will return to Alexandria on Friday, July 27. (Contributed)

One of Hollywood's notorious screen villains will return to Alexandria's Runestone Museum on Friday, July 27, for additional footage for a documentary series.

Actor Peter Stormare, who fed a body into a woodchipper in the movie "Fargo," and whose film and TV credits include "Prison Break," "The Big Lebowski," and "Longmire," visited Alexandria in May with an L.A.-based film crew researching the Kensington Runestone.

"It's exciting to have renewed interest in the stone as it's such an iconic part of our history," said museum director Amanda Seim.

The crew will visit the museum in the afternoon, and museum officials will remove the runestone cover for filming after the museum closes at its normal time, she said.

As part of the series, a sample of the Kensington runestone will undergo lab testing in Minneapolis, she said. Seim says archaeologists will map and grid the discovery site in Kensington Rune Stone Park on Saturday, July 28.

The Runestone Museum presents an objective interpretation of the stone, encouraging visitors to make up their own minds about its authenticity, Seim said. It welcomes continued research and tries to accommodate requests as best they can, she said.

"It's important to get people excited about discovering the past, excited about scientific investigation and excited about cultural heritage," she said. "The names of local businesses like Runestone Electric Association, Runestone Eye Care and Viking Bank demonstrates the impact the stone has had here — and why do you think the state of Minnesota named its football team Vikings?"

The crew is collecting footage at multiple sites around Minnesota with possible Middle Age Nordic connections, such as a gravel pit in Ashby.

A separate crew from London's Science Channel will visit sometime this fall for its own documentary, Seim said.

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